Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above.

12. Read the following sentences. The prompts in brackets will help you to determine the position of the logical stress. Make up a situation to prove the position of the logical stress:

We are going second class. (Not first)

I want a return ticket to Oxford. (Not single.)

What time do you Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. get up in summer? (I usually get up at seven.)

What shall I do with his luggage? (I know what to do with yours)

Can I have a try? (Nobody seems anxious to do it.)

He ran all the way to the station. (He was afraid to Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. be late.)

I saw Mary at the theatre yesterday. (Nor John.)

I'd like to have some tea. (Not Tom.)

I asked the porter to see to my luggage. (Nor you.)

13. Listen to the text on the tape ("Commerce and Industry"). Write it down. Mark the stresses and tunes. Practise the text Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above..

14. Read the following sentences. Use Intonation Patters VI to single out the subject:

Model: \Bri/tain │ is one of the most important commercial and trading centres in the world.

Australia is the smallest continent in the world.

Manchester is one of the most important industrial cities in Great Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. Britain.

Oxford is one of the oldest centres of education.

Washington is the capital of the United States.

Mary is my best friend.

The piano is to the right of the window.

England is a highly developed industrial country.

15. This exercise is meant to develop your ability to hear the Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. intonation and reproduce it in proper speech situations.

a) Listen to the text "Mother's Day" sentence by sentence. Write it down. Mark the stresses and tunes. Practise the text.

B) listen carefully to the narration of the text Observe the peculiarities in Intonation-group division, pitch, stress Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. and tempo. Note the use of temporizers. Reproduce the model narration of the text.

16. Read the text "May Day" silently to make sure you understand each sentence. Split up each sentence into intonation groups if necessary. Mark the stresses and tones. Underline the communicative centre and the nuclear word of Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. each intonation group. It is not expected that each student will intone the text in the same way. The teacher will help you to correct your variant

Practise reading the text several times.

Retell the text in your own words:

May Day

For over 100 years now May Day has been Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. recognized in some countries of the world as the workers' day. It is the day on which workers in these countries master their strength, and demonstrate their determination to struggle to achieve the demands which happen to be particularly pressing and urgent.

Last year's May Day in Britain Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. broke new ground in two ways.

It was the largest-ever demonstration to be held on May 1 itself in addition to the traditional demonstrations on May Sunday.

But it was more than a demonstration. It assumed the character of a national strike, involving hundreds of thousands of workers Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. who downed tools in London and a number of other major cities.

It was the culmination of an unprecedented campaign directed against the Government's intentions to put the clock back a century and more on trade-union rights.

It was a high point in the continuous struggle of the Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. trade unions for the unfettered right to use the strike weapon in furthering the interests of their membership.

It was a historic May Day not only in the role it played in achieving the immediate demand of retaining the sovereignty and independence of the unions.

Above all, the Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. flexing of their muscles and the victory achieved the following July, gave the workers of Britain a new sense of confidence and a deeper understanding that one hour of action is worth more than a thousand hours of argument and pleas for justice.

SECTION EIGHT. HIGH PRE-HEAD

Stress-and-tone Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. marks in the text: the High Pre-Head | ~ j.

The High Pre-Head never contains any stressed syllables. Before the High Fall it is said on the same pitch as the beginning of the fall. Before any other nuclear tone or any head the pitch of the High Pre-Head Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. is higher than the beginning of the following stressed syllable.

As compared to the Low Pre-Head the High Pre-Head is used to add vivacity, liveliness or excitement to the attitudes expressed in the sentence.

EXERCISES I.

HIGH PRE-HEAD + LOW FALL (+ TAIL)

Model: -I Make up a dialogue of your own, using some of the phrases from the dialogues above. \do /think it's a Ipity.

1. Listen carefully to the following conversational situations. Concentrate your attention on the intonation of the replies:


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